Shelf Life: February 2013

Shelf Life: February 2013Brief notes on books read in February 2013.

Illuminations, by Arthur Rimbaud, translated by John Ashbury13. Illuminations, by Arthur Rimbaud, translated by John Ashbury
(W. W. Norton & Company, 2012)

14. Illyria: Haunted, by Scott Tipton
(IDW, 2011)

15. Poems for an Oil-Free Coast
(Red Tower Bookworks, 2012)

Reviewed for Broken Pencil.

16. You Are Here, by James Pollock
(Porcupine’s Quill, 2012)

An excellent collection of reviews and essays about poetry, Canadian poetry in particular, with a focus on lyric and traditional forms. For a small sample, see this earlier post.

Hologram, by PK Page17. Hologram, by PK Page
(Brick Books, 1994)

18. Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Season 9, Volume 1: Freefall, by Joss Whedon
(Dark Horse, 2012)

19. Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Season 9, Volume 2: On Your Own, by Joss Whedon
(Dark Horse, 2012)

Season 8 seemed rather off, even for the ridiculousness of Buffy’s world, but in season 9 we’re getting back to basics. So far, less Mecha-Dawn, more finding room mates, waitressing, and putting her life back together. I like it.

20. Angel: A Hole in the World, by Scott Tipton
(Dark Horse, 2010)

How to Tell If Your Cat is Plotting to Kill You, by The Oatmeal21. How to Tell if Your Cat is Plotting to Kill You, by The Oatmeal
(Andrews McMeel Publishing, 2012)

22. An Oak Hutch, by Phil Hall
(Brick Books, 2005)

23. Budge, by Tom Osborne
(Anvil Press, 2012)

Reviewed for Broken Pencil.

24. Am I Disturbing You?, by Anne Hebert
(House of Anansi Press, 2009)

Back Alleys and Urban Landscapes, by Michael Cho25. Back Alleys and Urban Landscapes, by Michael Cho
(Drawn and Quarterly, 2012)

Gorgeous sketches of back alleys and streetscapes in Toronto. Telephone wires, satellite dishes, sloppy extensions, crumbling lawn furniture, rickety fences…it’s all instantly recognizable. I love it.

26. Full Frontal TO, by Patrick Cummins and Shawn Micallef
(Coach House Books, 2012)

Patrick Cummins has been photographing the same Toronto store fronts since 1978, going back, five years, ten years later, and getting the same shot. The evolution of the buildings, both in form and function, is fascinating, particularly with Shawn Micallef’s enthusiastic commentary.

Born Weird, by Andrew Kaufman27. Born Weird, by Andrew Kaufman
(Random House Canada, 2012)

28. [sic], by Nikki Reimer
(Frontenac House, 2010)

29. Winterkill, by Catherine Graham
(Insomniac Press, 2010)

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