Tag: graphic novels

BookishIn 2012 I read almost twice as many books by men as women, and in 2013 I wanted to change that. But my approach was kind of lazy. I didn’t actually do much to seek out books by women. I kind of forgot my mission, and just read whatever I found interesting, so I was a little worried about what I’d find.

In 2013 I read 171 books, 81 books written or edited by women, and 90 written or edited by men, 47% and 53% respectively. A heck of a lot better than the 35% I discovered last year, but still not balanced.

I read a lot more poetry (47) than fiction (22) in 2013, and of those, 62% of the poetry was written by women, and 55% of the fiction. It’s encouraging to see improvement here. I read more literary criticism and books on writing by women than I did previously, though this still accounts for only 42%. (NB: Still looking for recommendations for great critics – women or men.)

Shelf Life: August 2013Brief snippets of opinion and a too-long list. This month’s themes? Sex and writing, apparently.

Overqualified, by Joey Comeau106. Overqualified, by Joey Comeau
(ECW Press, 2009)

A novel told in cover letters, which shouldn’t work, but it does. As always, Comeau’s work is touching and disturbing in almost equal measures.

107. tether, by Jill Stengel
(above/ground press, 2013)

108. Mnemotechnics, by Jessica Smith
(above/ground press, 2013)

109. punchlines 1.0, by Aaron Tucker
(above/ground press, 2013)

Shelf Life: July 2013It’s summer. Traditionally a time for beach reading, fluff reading, right? This is how I’m justifying all the comics and manga to myself, anyway. Judge ye not, etc.

Spike: Asylum87. Spike: Asylum, by Brian Lynch
(IDW Publishing, 2007)

Brian Lynch has a terrible habit of over-explaining things both within the comics themselves, and then going over every obvious plot point and allusion yet again in the back pages of the graphic novel. I don’t know why he does this, and I really wish he’d stop. Somehow he missed the “show, don’t tell” lesson of story showing 101.

Anyway, Spike falls for an obvious deception and makes friends in an asylum claiming to cure supernatural beings. It’s all very silly, and not in the fun way that Shadow Puppets almost manages to pull off.