Tag: literature

BookishIn 2012 I read almost twice as many books by men as women, and in 2013 I wanted to change that. But my approach was kind of lazy. I didn’t actually do much to seek out books by women. I kind of forgot my mission, and just read whatever I found interesting, so I was a little worried about what I’d find.

In 2013 I read 171 books, 81 books written or edited by women, and 90 written or edited by men, 47% and 53% respectively. A heck of a lot better than the 35% I discovered last year, but still not balanced.

I read a lot more poetry (47) than fiction (22) in 2013, and of those, 62% of the poetry was written by women, and 55% of the fiction. It’s encouraging to see improvement here. I read more literary criticism and books on writing by women than I did previously, though this still accounts for only 42%. (NB: Still looking for recommendations for great critics – women or men.)

Shelf Life: August 2013Brief snippets of opinion and a too-long list. This month’s themes? Sex and writing, apparently.

Overqualified, by Joey Comeau106. Overqualified, by Joey Comeau
(ECW Press, 2009)

A novel told in cover letters, which shouldn’t work, but it does. As always, Comeau’s work is touching and disturbing in almost equal measures.

107. tether, by Jill Stengel
(above/ground press, 2013)

108. Mnemotechnics, by Jessica Smith
(above/ground press, 2013)

109. punchlines 1.0, by Aaron Tucker
(above/ground press, 2013)

Shelf Life: June 2013 Another month, another eclectic mix.

In Search of Duende, by Federico García Lorca74. In Search of Duende, by Federico García Lorca
(New Directions, 2010)

A combination of poetry, and essays which felt a bit over my head. This probably shouldn’t have been my first introduction to Lorca.

75. Gwendolyn MacEwan, Vol 2, by Gwendolyn MacEwan
(Exile Editions, 2001)

This series of short, reasonably priced books serve as an introduction to MacEwan’s work, with poetry, prose poems, and novel excerpts.

The introductory essays to each book are also great, very helpful in situating those unfamiliar with her work on MacEwan’s place in the Canadian poetry scene.