New review in Art/icualtion Magazine

The fall 2019 issue of Art/iculation Magazine has been released, and it contains my review of Joshua M. Ferguson’s Me, Myself, They.

The fall 2019 issue of Art/iculation Magazine has been released, and it contains my review of Joshua M. Ferguson’s Me, Myself, They.

Theme of the issue is “Queer and Now,” and the whole thing is excellent, with pieces by Sloast, Rebecca Rose, Samuel Singer, Stephanie Weidemann, Alec Butler, and so many other great writers and artists.

Me, Myself, They, by Joshua M Ferguson

Genderqueer and “other” gender identities is something I’ve been studying for a few years now,1 and this is the first time I came across a memoir by someone navigated their way though this in Canada. Indeed, Ferguson was born a few days from my birthdate and year, and we were both born in Ontario. Reading it, I couldn’t help but identify with Ferguson, but also note the numerous points where we diverged, and it made for a fascinating read.

Writing this review was difficult for me, as I had so much that I wanted to say that there wasn’t space for. We ended up having to edit it down quite a bit. In the original, I had a lengthy section about the pathologization of trans identities, and the harm that is wrought by this, which was further complicated by the current legal system’s requirement for authorizing documentation in order to correct one’s gender markers on official documents. A process that — despite the flaws that persist — Ferguson helped make possible in Ontario, and indeed in much of the rest of Canada as well.

There is so much still to be said about this topic, but it’s great to see a memoir from someone who’s impact on the trans and genderqueer rights has had a direct impact on the way we can claim space and move through various systems in a way that demands formal recognition that we exist. Its importance cannot be understated.

Anyway, check out the magazine. Please.

  1. “Other” being the broad umbrella under which identities that do not fit neatly into “male” or “female,” and are often categorized as “other” on various forms. []
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